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9th February
2009
written by Craig

I’ve been doing some tidying up lately, getting rid of stored junk, etc, and I’ve found a couple of notepads that I used to write down lyrics from songs I’d heard. No idea how old they are but I’m guessing around 12 years or so. Here’s some of John Martyn, (who sadly passed away just a couple of weeks ago,) from the song “Hurt In Your Heart” from the wonderful “Grace And Danger” album.
It’s a very emotional and incredibly personal CD, that really tugs at the heart strings.

“When that hurt in your heart has gone
When that hurt in your heart has gone
When that hurt in your heart has gone
Give me a call.

Darling, that’s all that you have to do
Show me a sign
A word or a line
One stitch in time
To save this poor heart
From breaking.

When that hurt in your heart has gone
When that hurt in your heart has gone
When that hurt in your heart has gone
I’ll still be your friend.

Right to the end of our river
And further still
This hurt it will mend
And I hope you’ll remember all the time
Hope you’ll remember every line
Hope you’ll remember
All the love, all the love, all the love.

When that hurt in your heart has gone
When that hurt in your heart has gone
When that hurt in your heart has gone
Just say my name.

You don’t have to say it loud
I’ll still feel the same
I’ll still be true
Waiting for you
To come sailing through
Cos I you know you can.

When that hurt in your heart has gone
When that hurt in your heart has gone
When that hurt in your heart has gone
Give me a call.”

The following is a direct quote from John Martyn’s website, which perfectly describes the songs.

Grace and Danger was released in October 1980 having been held up for a year by Island boss Chris Blackwell who was a close friend of John and Beverley’s and who found it too openly disturbing to release. Only after extreme pressure from John was it finally released and John got the exorcism that he needed. In the late 1980’s John would cite this album as his favourite. The album features Phil Collins and John Giblin. Giblin’s harmonic bass playing was in the style of Weather Report’s late (and great) Jaco Pastorius, a band and style John had long admired. Relying increasingly on his Gibson S.G. electric guitar, John’s playing was highly inventive and beguilingly. With John’s distinctive vocal delivery and painfully honest lyrics, Grace and Danger became a stunning exposition of confusion, heartache, love and remorse. John later said that it was “probably the most specific piece of autobiography I’ve written. Some people keep diaries, I make records.”

“At times the blending of Martyn’s voice and guitar, John Giblin’s beautiful bass and Phil Collins immaculate drumming is simply breathtaking.” – Melody Maker

John said, “I was in a dreadful emotional state over that record…I was hardly in control of my own actions. The reason they finally released it was because I freaked: Please get it out! I don’t give a damn about how sad it makes you feel – it’s what I’m about: direct communication of emotion.”

“Grace and Danger was very cathartic, and really hurt, I was really in love with that woman.”

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