Archive for February, 2009

9th February
2009
written by Craig

I’ve been doing some tidying up lately, getting rid of stored junk, etc, and I’ve found a couple of notepads that I used to write down lyrics from songs I’d heard. No idea how old they are but I’m guessing around 12 years or so. Here’s some of John Martyn, (who sadly passed away just a couple of weeks ago,) from the song “Hurt In Your Heart” from the wonderful “Grace And Danger” album.
It’s a very emotional and incredibly personal CD, that really tugs at the heart strings.

“When that hurt in your heart has gone
When that hurt in your heart has gone
When that hurt in your heart has gone
Give me a call.

Darling, that’s all that you have to do
Show me a sign
A word or a line
One stitch in time
To save this poor heart
From breaking.

When that hurt in your heart has gone
When that hurt in your heart has gone
When that hurt in your heart has gone
I’ll still be your friend.

Right to the end of our river
And further still
This hurt it will mend
And I hope you’ll remember all the time
Hope you’ll remember every line
Hope you’ll remember
All the love, all the love, all the love.

When that hurt in your heart has gone
When that hurt in your heart has gone
When that hurt in your heart has gone
Just say my name.

You don’t have to say it loud
I’ll still feel the same
I’ll still be true
Waiting for you
To come sailing through
Cos I you know you can.

When that hurt in your heart has gone
When that hurt in your heart has gone
When that hurt in your heart has gone
Give me a call.”

The following is a direct quote from John Martyn’s website, which perfectly describes the songs.

Grace and Danger was released in October 1980 having been held up for a year by Island boss Chris Blackwell who was a close friend of John and Beverley’s and who found it too openly disturbing to release. Only after extreme pressure from John was it finally released and John got the exorcism that he needed. In the late 1980’s John would cite this album as his favourite. The album features Phil Collins and John Giblin. Giblin’s harmonic bass playing was in the style of Weather Report’s late (and great) Jaco Pastorius, a band and style John had long admired. Relying increasingly on his Gibson S.G. electric guitar, John’s playing was highly inventive and beguilingly. With John’s distinctive vocal delivery and painfully honest lyrics, Grace and Danger became a stunning exposition of confusion, heartache, love and remorse. John later said that it was “probably the most specific piece of autobiography I’ve written. Some people keep diaries, I make records.”

“At times the blending of Martyn’s voice and guitar, John Giblin’s beautiful bass and Phil Collins immaculate drumming is simply breathtaking.” – Melody Maker

John said, “I was in a dreadful emotional state over that record…I was hardly in control of my own actions. The reason they finally released it was because I freaked: Please get it out! I don’t give a damn about how sad it makes you feel – it’s what I’m about: direct communication of emotion.”

“Grace and Danger was very cathartic, and really hurt, I was really in love with that woman.”

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8th February
2009
written by Craig

I was flicking through the music biography “Dream Brother: The Lives And Music Of Jeff And Tim Buckley”, and found myself reading a small paragraph about Tim’s song “I Never Asked To Be Your Mountain”
I’ve always liked this song, there’s so much power and feeling in it. I can almost imagine him swirling like a dervish singing this.

“O Flying Flying Fish
Please flutter by my door
Yes you can drink my lies
If first you read my eyes
Each one is titled
“I’m drowning back to you”
I can’t swim your waters
And you can’t walk my lands:
I’m sailing all my sins
And I’m climbing all my fears
And soon now I’ll fly”

The song builds up to a crescendo, and ends like this:

“Sweet lover, will you come back
And love me for a while?
Please take my hand
Leave all your fears behind

I’ve been gone too long
Now I’m home to stay
Please don’t leave me
Again this way

Please come home”

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7th February
2009
written by Craig

I’ve been listening to some music I have on cassette lately, and the final one I listened to had a mix of things I’d recorded off movies. Morphine’s “Gone For Good” I got from “2 Days In The Valley” (seems I must have recorded this around 12 years ago!) It’s one of those songs that with its simple guitar picking and lonesome voice urges you to just sit and listen to the lyrics. It had that same effect tonight.

“I’m never going back
Never going back to you
I’m never going to see you again
I’m never going to dig out your picture
I’m never going to look you up someday
Life is very short
You don’t love me anymore
So I’m never going to see you again

I’m never going to write you a letter
Never going to call you on the phone
I’m never going to drive by your house
I’m never going to catch you coming outside
Never going to walk up your walk and ring your bell and feel you fall into my arms
I’m never going to see you
I’m never going to see you
I’m never going to see you again
You’re gone for good”

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